CANTERBURY HISTORICAL 

& ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY (CHAS)

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Description

 

Mathematical tiles are tiles, attached to horizontal wooden battens, which are made to give the appearance of bricks.  As with true bricks, the joints between the faces of the tiles are pointed with mortar. They were introduced in the from the 18th century onwards, mainly to 'modernise' timber framed properties.  Canterbury has a large number of properties with mathematical tiles, with a particular concentration through Sun Street, the Buttermarket, and Burgate. In some cases the lower walls are true brick and the remainder mathematical tiles (see third example below).

 

Local examples (click to enlarge and read captions)

Mathematical tiles

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Sun Street

Buttermarket

Cathedral precincts

> MORE ON MATHEMATICAL TILES
> FEATURES INDEX A - H > FEATURES INDEX I - P
> FEATURES INDEX Q - Z FEATURES STYLES BIBLIOGRAPHY